Jewelry stores in Summerville, SC

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We want like to take a moment to welcome you to Colucci’s Jewelers – Summerville’s premier jewelry store for more than 60 years. We are so happy that you decided to visit our website! We hope that while you’re here, you will begin to get a sense of why so many customers choose Colucci’s Jewelers over other jewelry stores in Summerville, SC.
In an industry known for snobby salespeople and overpriced items, Colucci’s Jewelers brings warm smiles and affordable prices to jewelry shoppers in the Lowcountry. Unlike other jewelers in Summerville, the Colucci team focuses on providing customers with an unmatched jewelry experience, from the moment they pull into our parking lot to the minute they leave our showroom. We believe our customers deserve special attention, and our goal is to provide them with friendly, personalized service every time they visit.

The Colucci Difference

As a certified jeweler with more than 50 years in the industry, Stefan Colucci has built his reputation on excellence and execution. With a wealth of knowledge and a passion for precision, Stefan pours his heart into every custom-made piece of jewelry, repair, restoration, and appraisal that he completes at Colucci’s Jewelers. With consistent craftsmanship and impressive attention to detail, Stefan’s ability to cater to all your jewelry needs will exceed your expectations every time.
While Stefan focuses on creating unforgettable custom jewelry for you or your loved one, his wife Summer specializes in customer service. Kind, patient, and knowledgeable in her own right, Summer will take all the time necessary to answer your questions and guide you through the jewelry selection process. Whether you’re stressed out looking for the perfect diamond engagement ring or need to restore a priceless family heirloom, Summer will make sure you receive the attention you deserve.
When you shop at Colucci’s Jewelry, understand that we will never try to pressure you into a purchase or provide you with lackluster service if you’re “window shopping.” We treat each of our customers with the same exceptional care, whether they are repeat clients or new faces.
Colucci’s is a name you can trust – there’s a reason we were voted Best Jeweler in 2019 by Readers Choice!

We offer several different jewelry styles and services in Summerville, from breathtaking engagement rings to extensive repairs. Keep reading to learn more about a few of our specialties.

Diamond Engagement Rings in Summerville

Proposing to the love of your life is one of the most beautiful, memorable moments that two people will ever share as a couple. An engagement ring symbolizes love and acceptance; it epitomizes trust and commitment. While no two proposals will ever be exactly the same, there is one constant that will always remain true: the diamond engagement ring you choose from Colucci’s Jewelers will give you a lifetime of pleasure and contentment.
We understand that choosing the right engagement ring is one of the most important decisions you can make. That is why we pair the finest engagement jewelry in Summerville, SC, with one-on-one showings and helpful advice – to ensure that you discover dazzling rings at an affordable price. With the Colucci team by your side, we take second-guessing out of the equation, so you can focus on popping the question with confidence. After all, a diamond engagement ring is meant to be cherished for a lifetime!

Factors to Consider Before Buying an Engagement Ring

We find that taking the time to give our clients as much information as possible makes their experience easier and more enjoyable. Before you visit our store in person, consider the following factors when choosing an engagement ring:

  • Ring Size: Knowing your fiancée’s ring size is crucial, especially if you’re planning a surprise without her knowing. Borrow one of her rings and bring it to Colucci’s Jewelers, and we will measure free of charge. For the perfect fit, we can also resize her ring when the time is right.
  • Jewelry Preference: Sapphire? Ruby? Emerald? Diamond? At Colucci Jewelry, we have a wide range of gemstones to choose from which to choose, as well as settings and metal types. Ask your fiancée’s friends or family for tips, or better yet, ask her yourself if you can do so without spoiling the surprise.
  • 4 C’s: The four C’s represent color, clarity, cut, and carat weight. If you’re just starting your search, this system might be foreign to you, but it is a trusted grading system used throughout the world. We recommend you visit Colucci’s Jewelers for a quick education on this system, so you can find a quality diamond at a price that fits within your budget.

On-Site Jewelry Services in Summerville

With regular care and maintenance, your piece of fine jewelry from Colucci’s Jewelers will give you a lifetime of enjoyment. Whether your favorite emerald necklace needs cleaning or a small diamond in your engagement ring is loose, we are happy to help. With more than 50 years of experience as Colucci’s Jewelers’ in-house repair expert, Stefan Colucci will handle your jewelry with care and compassion. Stefan is also highly skilled at creating designer jewelry in Summerville, SC. If you have a grand idea for a custom jewelry project, Stefan will consult with you one-on-one to turn your dream into reality.

In addition to the above services, Colucci Jewelers also offers:

  • Class Rings
  • Cash for Gold
  • Gold Dealer Services
  • Consignment Services
  • Custom Diamond Engagement Rings
  • Luxury Watches
  • Luxury Watch Repair
  • Rhodium Plating
  • Same-Day Jewelry Repair
  • Gold Coins for Sale
  • Restringing

Don’t risk sending your jewelry off to another state or country to be repaired by someone you can’t see or talk to – as the premier on-site jewelry store in Summerville, we will handle all of your jewelry needs in person, with hard work and a smile.

If you need to get your fine jewelry appraised for insurance purposes, Colucci’s Jewelers can help.

It’s a great idea to get your jewelry appraised periodically. As the years pass along, the value of your precious metals and gemstones can fluctuate. If your last appraisal was more than two years ago, you could run into problems with your insurance coverage. If your jewelry is insured for less than its replacement value, you could lose a substantial amount of money if it is stolen or lost.

To help prevent situations like this from happening, our on-site jeweler Stefan Colucci will provide you with an up-to-date appraisal report based on your jewelry’s current market value. That way, you can update your insurance accordingly.

We also specialize in estate jewelry appraisals, so you know exactly how much your old jewelry is worth if you are thinking of selling.

Our appraisal services include:

  • Diamond Appraisals
  • Insurance Appraisals
  • Court Appraisals
  • Estate Jewelry Appraisals
  • Cash Offer for Appraised Jewelry

Jewelry Appraisal Services in Summerville

Sell Your Jewelry in Summerville

Selling jewelry from years past can be a hard experience. Estate jewelry, in particular, can have sentimental value attached and can be hard to sell. This is because jewelry is often a symbol of achievement or affection, such as your class ring from high school or your grandmother’s wedding band. At Colucci’s Jewelers, we understand the connection to old jewelry and appreciate the memories and value you have with these antique pieces.

In addition to the personal value, antique and estate jewelry can be quite valuable from a monetary standpoint. Estate jewelry is extremely popular in this day and age. Many Lowcountry locals are selling their vintage pieces to trusted jewelry stores in Summerville, SC, like Colucci’s Jewelers.

Many customers choose to sell their jewelry to Colucci’s Jewelers because we offer an intimate, honest experience – something that you will certainly not receive if you list your jewelry for sale on an internet marketplace. We will be upfront with you every step of the way to help separate personal value from monetary value, and will present you with a fair offer to consider.

If you are interested in selling your jewelry, we encourage you to visit our showroom to meet our staff and get an accurate appraisal of your jewelry’s worth.

We buy a multitude of different jewelry, including:
  • Estate Jewelry
  • Custom Jewelry
  • Antique Jewelry
  • Diamonds
  • Rubies
  • Sapphires
  • Emeralds
  • Male Wedding Rings
  • Female Wedding Rings
  • Engagement Rings
  • Bracelets
  • Earrings
  • Necklaces
  • Gold
  • Silver
  • Platinum
  • All-Things Rolex

Summerville’s Most Trusted Jewelry Store

We are proud and grateful to have served thousands of customers looking for quality jewelry and a relaxed, no-pressure atmosphere. We would love the opportunity to speak with you face-to-face so that we can learn what you’re looking for and what you love about jewelry. Whether you’re looking for a custom diamond engagement ring or need friendly advice about what looks right, we are here help.

Latest News in Summerville

Young at Heart: 87-Year-Old Mathews Coach Energizes Football Program

VIENNA, Ohio – Bill Bohren emphasizes instructions written on whiteboards in clear view of the more than two dozen football players who are intently listening to him. The Mathews High School players eventually migrate from the team’s indoor facility to a practice field on the other side of the Mustangs’ stadium, where Bohren still holds their attention. “I like how much he cares about the sport and us – putting effort into it,” Mathews rising senior Austin Barnes says of Bohren, who is 87 yea...

VIENNA, Ohio – Bill Bohren emphasizes instructions written on whiteboards in clear view of the more than two dozen football players who are intently listening to him.

The Mathews High School players eventually migrate from the team’s indoor facility to a practice field on the other side of the Mustangs’ stadium, where Bohren still holds their attention.

“I like how much he cares about the sport and us – putting effort into it,” Mathews rising senior Austin Barnes says of Bohren, who is 87 years old.

Despite his age, Bohren’s power is quite evident, including to Kevin Haynie, the team’s offensive coordinator.

“He has more energy than any coach and any player in this room,” he says.

Bohren was hired to helm the Mustangs in December. His previous coaching stops include Ottawa-Glandorf, Steubenville, Portsmouth, Lakeview, Boardman, Butler (Pa.), Salem, Niles, LaBrae and Southington.

Bohren’s longevity as a coach is matched by only a few. John McKissick of Summerville (S.C.) High School is the only coach who showed up in an internet search with more time than Bohren. McKissick retired in 2015 at age 89 after 63 years.

Bohren has a record of 295-171-6, but states he’s not hellbent on getting 300 wins. That’s not why he took this position.

“If it comes, it comes,” he says. “If it doesn’t, it doesn’t.”

Bohren, who spent the last three years as an assistant coach at Niles McKinley, said he yearned to run his own program again. The last time he was head coach was 2017 at Southington.

At Mathews, he replaced John Protopapa, who spent five years with the Mustangs’ program.

“It was the idea I wanted to coach again,” Bohren says.

The veteran coach is optimistic about the 2021 season, saying he has about 30 players, including 15 freshman – five who will likely play on Friday nights this fall. There’s five varsity coaches on staff with three at the junior-high level, stating his program has some good, young kids. Mathews begins the 10-game 2021 season Aug. 20, hosting Steubenville Catholic Central at Mathews’ Booster Field in Vienna.

“I think they’re going to have a winning season every year,” Bohren says.

The season began as Haynie, the school’s physical education instructor, had the players lifting weights in January, soon after Bohren was hired.

Bohren says his teams have a reputation for running the football, and that won’t be changing as Mathews seeks to win the small-school based Northeastern Athletic Conference with teams from Trumbull and Ashtabula Counties.

“If you’re rebuilding a program that hasn’t had much success for a few years, one of the easy ways to run the clock is to run the ball,” Bohren says. “All this spread [passing offense] stuff you go bang, bang, bang and you took 15 seconds off the clock.”

Bohren’s career started in 1963 as a graduate assistant coach for the Illinois State University football team. Prior to moving to Illinois, he played for Ambridge (Pa.) High School – a place he revered.

He says open enrollment in most school systems, which allows players to transfer to other teams, makes it near impossible to retain athletes at their home institutions like Mathews.

“Kids just jump all over the place,” Bohren says. “There’s no loyalty. I wanted to play in Ambridge with all the kids I grew up watching, playing in that stadium. That’s what you want here. You want kids who want to play for Mathews High School.”

That school spirit does not begin with pep talks before games. Motivating players starts with the preparation the week before, he says. It has to be one cohesive unit taking the field on Friday nights.

“You got to treat the kids like they’re your own kids,” he says. “There has to be that esprit de corps in your football program. That comes for them all the way down from the coaches, captains on your team, your senior leadership and the community. “

That unity starts with the team’s coaching staff.

Haynie works in tandem with Bohren. The two live near each other in Cortland and seem to tag team the coaching responsibilities at Mathews.

Bohren does not have a cellular phone or email. All he has is a landline, which means Haynie attends to any online materials needed to keep the team functioning.

“He’s worried about football,” Haynie says of Bohren. “That’s all he cares about.”

Pictured: Bill Bohren, head football coach for Mathews High School, meets with the team before a practice.

Copyright 2021 The Business Journal, Youngstown, Ohio.

Dorchester County Council 'frustrated,' voting on soccer club's land use agreement again

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCIV) — An ongoing dispute between Dorchester County and the Charleston Soccer Club may be coming to a head on Monday. The county wants to take the soccer fields in Summerville and create a world-class sports complex, but the soccer club is leasing the fields from the county until 2046. The county and soccer club have been going back and forth for months and don't seem any closer to a resolution. The fields are in the Oakbrook Tax Increment Financing District, also known as TIF. The specia...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCIV) — An ongoing dispute between Dorchester County and the Charleston Soccer Club may be coming to a head on Monday.

The county wants to take the soccer fields in Summerville and create a world-class sports complex, but the soccer club is leasing the fields from the county until 2046.

The county and soccer club have been going back and forth for months and don't seem any closer to a resolution.

The fields are in the Oakbrook Tax Increment Financing District, also known as TIF.

The special tax revenue would allow the county to fix areas that haven't seen a lot of investment.

County council wants to invest $5 million toward the property. Plans call for six soccer fields, two basketball courts, along with all new parking and a renovated main building.

But to do that, the lease with the club would need to be terminated.

The county has already voted twice to end the lease, saying the soccer club was in violation of the land use agreement - citing fencing issues and public access.

But the county has continued extending the agreement in hopes of reaching common ground.

"Our goal is to have a stellar soccer complex there that will allow us to get a lot of people there playing, that will potentially allow us to bring in other teams from the state, other areas outside of the state to maybe have small soccer tournaments there," said Dorchester County Councilmember David Chinnis.

ABC News 4 asked Chinnis if they've already terminated the agreement twice now and keep going back on it, what's different this time?

He says the level of frustration.

Melissa Britton is the executive director of the Charleston Soccer Club.

She argues the soccer club has allowed public use of the fields.

The county wants the club to sign off on a memorandum of understanding.

Tax rules would require that agreement be re-evaluated every 199 days.

In theory, the county could decide if the club would be allowed to continue using the field. Britton says she can't sign the document in good faith.

"They can’t just unilaterally kick us out, there’s a due process that has to be followed and I think they’d have to file lawsuits," said Britton.

She adds she's willing to fight this until the end, even if that means going to the courts.

Both parties say they'd like to come to a resolution where everyone wins.

Council will be voting on whether to terminate the land use agreement at its meeting on Monday.

Britton says she plans on having representation at it.

Camp offers high school students head start on pilot career

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. — Minette du Plooy wants to fly. The 18-year-old from Prosper has her mind set on becoming an Air Force pilot. She’s so committed that she convinced her parents to drive three days and book a hotel in Charleston so she could spend two weeks learning from instructors at a CRAFT Flight Training and Simulation camp. The decision, and all that came with it, were worth it. “It’s incredible,” du Plooy said. “I wouldn’t change giving up two weeks of my summer to do thi...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. — Minette du Plooy wants to fly.

The 18-year-old from Prosper has her mind set on becoming an Air Force pilot. She’s so committed that she convinced her parents to drive three days and book a hotel in Charleston so she could spend two weeks learning from instructors at a CRAFT Flight Training and Simulation camp.

The decision, and all that came with it, were worth it.

“It’s incredible,” du Plooy said. “I wouldn’t change giving up two weeks of my summer to do this.”

Seven high school students and recent grads participated in CRAFT’s first-ever summer camp from July 11 to 23 at the Summerville Airport. Most of the students come from around South Carolina, with du Plooy being the only person to travel across state lines.

For the inaugural camp, the flight school reached out to the Lowcountry Aviation Association and Charleston Southern University to find students interested in participating.

The goal of the camp is to give high schoolers a head start on receiving a pilot’s license, said Jay Aldea, co-owner of CRAFT. By the end of the camp, the students earn an endorsement to take the Federal Aviation Administration’s private pilot exam.

The students go into the camp at any skill level. While some entered with hours of flying experience, others, like du Plooy, had only been in a plane one or two times.

The students spend each day cycling through three different types of lessons: ground school, simulator training and flight.

In ground school, the students learn everything they need to know for their written exam. They spend about four hours nestled in a small classroom in the airport taking lessons from an instructor.

The school teaches them the mechanics of the plane and the rules and regulations. While it might seem like the most boring part of the entire experience, the ground schools lays the foundation for what the students will do later on.

“Sitting up there in ground school, it does not make that much sense,” du Plooy said. “But the next day when you fly, it makes so much more sense. It all fits perfectly together.”

The students then spend one or two hours in a simulator. They take the wheel of a large metal box outfitted like the cockpit of a plane and resembling an arcade game.

With those skills in hand, the students are then able to start flying. By the time the camps ends, they’ll have about 12 hours of flying experience with an instructor and learning the fundamentals including navigation, turns and acceleration. They’ll work their way up to slow flight, where the speed is slow enough that the pilot has full control.

The slow flight is crucial as it’s used whenever a pilot is taking off or landing the plane.

“It feels like the plane is on a stick or a needle,” Aldea said. “Having them comfortable in that type of environment or that type of flight regime, allows them to have confidence controlling the aircraft.”

By the end, the students should have the endorsement to do their solo flight, Aldea said. The solo flight and the endorsement for the private pilot’s exam are the first steps in a piloting career.

The camp has been eye-opening for its four instructors as well. Todd Brooks, who came to Charleston from the Washington, D.C., area for the camp, said he’s enjoyed experiencing the thrill of flying vicariously through his students.

“It’s usually their first time ever being in a small plane,” he said. “You see the lights click on a little bit and they think ‘wow this is so cool.’”

Aldea hopes the camp can give the students a sense of their options when it comes to being a pilot.

“There’s a lot of misconceptions about being a pilot and what that entails,” he said. “A lot of folks think that they have to take the military route, and that’s not necessarily the case.”

For many, pursuing a career as a pilot can be daunting and inaccessible. Getting a pilot’s license is no small feat and can mean thousands of dollars in schooling. The flight camp alone costs students around $3,000.

Through connections with the Lowcountry Aviation Association and other groups like Women in Aviation, however, most of the students were able to secure scholarships and have the program fully covered.

Emmanuel Peterson, a rising senior at Georgetown High School, said he was able to attend the camp through a scholarship. Without the opportunity, he isn’t sure that he’d be able to afford flight school to do his solo flight.

Ultimately, Peterson wants to be a commercial pilot, a job that no one in his family has pursued before.

“It’s a career that’s out there … being able to go to new places every day,” he said. “It’s like a thrill.”

Aldea said the camp is also an opportunity to network with collegiate flight programs. The school has a partnership with Charleston Southern University, which is the first school in the state to offer a collegiate pilot program.

“A lot of people won’t be exposed to that stuff early on,” Aldea said. “That’s part of our mission here to expose students to a potential occupation and potential lifestyle.”

Although it is limited by space, CRAFT hopes to expand the camp in future years to include more students, Aldea said.

PPP Loans Benefited Summerville Businesses

SUMMERVILLE, SC — Applications for the federal Paycheck Protection Program have closed after benefiting more than 11.8 million pandemic-stricken businesses, including many in Summerville. The Paycheck Protection Program started in April 2020 as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES), and was extended until May 31, 2021. There were 90,624 PPP loans approved in South Carolina in 2021 alone, according to the Small Business Administration. The total 2021 amount approved was $3,058,629,335. ...

SUMMERVILLE, SC — Applications for the federal Paycheck Protection Program have closed after benefiting more than 11.8 million pandemic-stricken businesses, including many in Summerville.

The Paycheck Protection Program started in April 2020 as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES), and was extended until May 31, 2021.

There were 90,624 PPP loans approved in South Carolina in 2021 alone, according to the Small Business Administration. The total 2021 amount approved was $3,058,629,335.

Loan applications were processed through banks and other traditional lenders, with the SBA backing the resulting loans. Around $800 billion in loans were approved nationwide under the program.

The loans are forgivable if borrowers meet certain criteria, including spending at least 60 percent of the money on payroll costs and maintaining employee compensation levels.

Below are some Summerville businesses that benefited from the program according to the SBA. Check here for a full, searchable database.

SCOUT BOATS, INC.

SPORTSMAN BOATS MANUFACTURING, INC.

KNIGHT'S COMPANIES, INC.

SWEETGRASS PEDIATRICS LLC

MCELVEEN BUICK-GMC, INC.

ORIGIN POINT BRANDS, LLC

CHARLESTON GASTROENTEROLOGY SPECIALISTS, PA

AFFINITY HEALTHCARE SOLUTIONS LLC

HOOVER AUTOMOTIVE, LLC

SUMMERVILLE AUTO LLC

Nationally, the accommodation/food service industry received the largest share of loans in 2021, with 15 percent of the total.

Around 87 percent of the loans approved in 2021 were for $50,000 or less, and they accounted for a third of the total approved amount. The average loan size was $42,000.

The program wasn't without controversy. Banks tended to prioritize large, established businesses, according to a New York Times analysis. Congress raised fees for small loans in December to encourage lenders to make small business loans, and rules were changed in February to allow unprofitable solo businesses to qualify.

Several large companies drew public ire after it was revealed that they took PPP loans instead of relying on traditional capital-raising activities. The outcry prompted the SBA to review all loan applications over $2 million and issue guidance that the program was intended for businesses that lacked access to other cash-raising methods.

Editor's note: This list was automatically generated using data from the SBA for approved loans of $150,000 or more, although some loans ultimately were not made. Business owners can contact the SBA if information about a loan isn't correct. SBA data occasionally contains duplicate entries. Other feedback can be sent to content@patch.com.

Summerville fall youth sports registration opens

Registration for Summerville Parks and Recreation Fall 2021 youth sports programs runs through Aug. 1. The town has opened registration for its Youth flag football, tee ball, baseball and soccer Fall seasons. All programs are coed. Registration for all programs is available at the Town of Summerville Parks and Recreation Office located at 301 North Hickory Street from 8:30 a.m. until 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. Saturdays and from noon until 6 p.m. Sundays as well as by appointment only at the Gahag...

Registration for Summerville Parks and Recreation Fall 2021 youth sports programs runs through Aug. 1.

The town has opened registration for its Youth flag football, tee ball, baseball and soccer Fall seasons. All programs are coed.

Registration for all programs is available at the Town of Summerville Parks and Recreation Office located at 301 North Hickory Street from 8:30 a.m. until 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. Saturdays and from noon until 6 p.m. Sundays as well as by appointment only at the Gahagan Park Office at 515 West Boundary Street. Online registration is available at https://secure.rec1.com/SC/summerville-sc/catalog.

The registration fee is $45 for Summerville residents and $65 for non-residents. A $10 late fee will be added starting Aug. 2. Forms of payment accepted include cash, check and credit cards.

A birth certificate or military ID, proof of residency and proof of medical insurance are required to register.

Practices for all Fall programs will start in August. Games will be played evenings Monday through Thursday and/or Saturday mornings in mid-September and October at the Jerry Blackwell Sports Complex at Gahagan Park with the one exception being the town’s 10U baseball teams that compete at a different local facility.

Each Fall program has its own age groups and equipment requirements, but none allow the use of metal cleats for any age group.

Youth flag football age groups are: 5U (4-5), 7U (6-7) 9U (8-9), 11U (10-11) and 14U (12-14). Participants must provide their own mouthpiece and “no pocket” pants. Participants will receive a game jersey. Teams will be furnished with footballs, flags and other necessary equipment.

Youth baseball age groups are: Tee Ball 4U (3-4) and 6U (5-6), Coach Pitch 8U (7-8), and Baseball 10U (9-10). Participants must provide their own grey baseball pants and a glove. Participants for the 8U and 10U groups must provide their own batting helmet with a mask.

Baseball players will receive a game jersey and a cap. Teams will be furnished with bats, balls and tees. Catcher gear will be supplied for 8-10 group.

Youth soccer age groups are: 4U (3-4), 6U (5-6), 8U (7-8) and 10U (9-10). Participants must provide their shin guards and “no pocket” pants. Participants will receive a game jersey and socks. Teams will be furnished with additional soccer balls, cones, and other equipment.

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