Colucci’s Jewelers. | 10016 Dorchester rd Summerville SC 29485

Jewelry stores in James Island, SC

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We want like to take a moment to welcome you to Colucci’s Jewelers – James Island’s premier jewelry store for more than 60 years. We are so happy that you decided to visit our website! We hope that while you’re here, you will begin to get a sense of why so many customers choose Colucci’s Jewelers over other jewelry stores in James Island, SC.
In an industry known for snobby salespeople and overpriced items, Colucci’s Jewelers brings warm smiles and affordable prices to jewelry shoppers in the Lowcountry. Unlike other jewelers in James Island, the Colucci team focuses on providing customers with an unmatched jewelry experience, from the moment they pull into our parking lot to the minute they leave our showroom. We believe our customers deserve special attention, and our goal is to provide them with friendly, personalized service every time they visit.

Service Areas

The Colucci Difference

As a certified jeweler with more than 50 years in the industry, Stefan Colucci has built his reputation on excellence and execution. With a wealth of knowledge and a passion for precision, Stefan pours his heart into every custom-made piece of jewelry, repair, restoration, and appraisal that he completes at Colucci’s Jewelers. With consistent craftsmanship and impressive attention to detail, Stefan’s ability to cater to all your jewelry needs will exceed your expectations every time.
While Stefan focuses on creating unforgettable custom jewelry for you or your loved one, his wife Summer specializes in customer service. Kind, patient, and knowledgeable in her own right, Summer will take all the time necessary to answer your questions and guide you through the jewelry selection process. Whether you’re stressed out looking for the perfect diamond engagement ring or need to restore a priceless family heirloom, Summer will make sure you receive the attention you deserve.
When you shop at Colucci’s Jewelry, understand that we will never try to pressure you into a purchase or provide you with lackluster service if you’re “window shopping.” We treat each of our customers with the same exceptional care, whether they are repeat clients or new faces.
Colucci’s is a name you can trust – there’s a reason we were voted Best Jeweler in 2019 by Readers Choice!

The Colucci Difference

We offer several different jewelry styles and services in James Island, from breathtaking engagement rings to extensive repairs. Keep reading to learn more about a few of our specialties.

The Colucci Difference

Diamond Engagement Rings in James Island

Proposing to the love of your life is one of the most beautiful, memorable moments that two people will ever share as a couple. An engagement ring symbolizes love and acceptance; it epitomizes trust and commitment. While no two proposals will ever be exactly the same, there is one constant that will always remain true: the diamond engagement ring you choose from Colucci’s Jewelers will give you a lifetime of pleasure and contentment.
We understand that choosing the right engagement ring is one of the most important decisions you can make. That is why we pair the finest engagement jewelry in James Island, SC, with one-on-one showings and helpful advice – to ensure that you discover dazzling rings at an affordable price. With the Colucci team by your side, we take second-guessing out of the equation, so you can focus on popping the question with confidence. After all, a diamond engagement ring is meant to be cherished for a lifetime!

Factors to Consider Before Buying an Engagement Ring

We find that taking the time to give our clients as much information as possible makes their experience easier and more enjoyable. Before you visit our store in person, consider the following factors when choosing an engagement ring:

  • Ring Size: Knowing your fiancée’s ring size is crucial, especially if you’re planning a surprise without her knowing. Borrow one of her rings and bring it to Colucci’s Jewelers, and we will measure free of charge. For the perfect fit, we can also resize her ring when the time is right.
  • Jewelry Preference: Sapphire? Ruby? Emerald? Diamond? At Colucci Jewelry, we have a wide range of gemstones to choose from which to choose, as well as settings and metal types. Ask your fiancée’s friends or family for tips, or better yet, ask her yourself if you can do so without spoiling the surprise.
  • 4 C’s: The four C’s represent color, clarity, cut, and carat weight. If you’re just starting your search, this system might be foreign to you, but it is a trusted grading system used throughout the world. We recommend you visit Colucci’s Jewelers for a quick education on this system, so you can find a quality diamond at a price that fits within your budget.
Factors to Consider Before Buying an Engagement Ring

On-Site Jewelry Services in James Island

On-Site Jewelry Services in James Island

With regular care and maintenance, your piece of fine jewelry from Colucci’s Jewelers will give you a lifetime of enjoyment. Whether your favorite emerald necklace needs cleaning or a small diamond in your engagement ring is loose, we are happy to help. With more than 50 years of experience as Colucci’s Jewelers’ in-house repair expert, Stefan Colucci will handle your jewelry with care and compassion. Stefan is also highly skilled at creating designer jewelry in James Island, SC. If you have a grand idea for a custom jewelry project, Stefan will consult with you one-on-one to turn your dream into reality.

In addition to the above services, Colucci Jewelers also offers:

  • Class Rings
  • Cash for Gold
  • Gold Dealer Services
  • Consignment Services
  • Custom Diamond Engagement Rings
  • Luxury Watches
  • Luxury Watch Repair
  • Rhodium Plating
  • Same-Day Jewelry Repair
  • Gold Coins for Sale
  • Restringing

Don’t risk sending your jewelry off to another state or country to be repaired by someone you can’t see or talk to – as the premier on-site jewelry store in James Island, we will handle all of your jewelry needs in person, with hard work and a smile.

If you need to get your fine jewelry appraised for insurance purposes, Colucci’s Jewelers can help.

It’s a great idea to get your jewelry appraised periodically. As the years pass along, the value of your precious metals and gemstones can fluctuate. If your last appraisal was more than two years ago, you could run into problems with your insurance coverage. If your jewelry is insured for less than its replacement value, you could lose a substantial amount of money if it is stolen or lost.

To help prevent situations like this from happening, our on-site jeweler Stefan Colucci will provide you with an up-to-date appraisal report based on your jewelry’s current market value. That way, you can update your insurance accordingly.

We also specialize in estate jewelry appraisals, so you know exactly how much your old jewelry is worth if you are thinking of selling.

Our appraisal services include:

  • Diamond Appraisals
  • Insurance Appraisals
  • Court Appraisals
  • Estate Jewelry Appraisals
  • Cash Offer for Appraised Jewelry

Jewelry Appraisal Services in James Island

Jewelry Appraisal Services in James Island
On-Site Jewelry Services in James Island

Sell Your Jewelry in James Island

Selling jewelry from years past can be a hard experience. Estate jewelry, in particular, can have sentimental value attached and can be hard to sell. This is because jewelry is often a symbol of achievement or affection, such as your class ring from high school or your grandmother’s wedding band. At Colucci’s Jewelers, we understand the connection to old jewelry and appreciate the memories and value you have with these antique pieces.

In addition to the personal value, antique and estate jewelry can be quite valuable from a monetary standpoint. Estate jewelry is extremely popular in this day and age. Many Lowcountry locals are selling their vintage pieces to trusted jewelry stores in James Island, SC, like Colucci’s Jewelers.

Many customers choose to sell their jewelry to Colucci’s Jewelers because we offer an intimate, honest experience – something that you will certainly not receive if you list your jewelry for sale on an internet marketplace. We will be upfront with you every step of the way to help separate personal value from monetary value, and will present you with a fair offer to consider.

If you are interested in selling your jewelry, we encourage you to visit our showroom to meet our staff and get an accurate appraisal of your jewelry’s worth.

We buy a multitude of different jewelry, including:
  • Estate Jewelry
  • Custom Jewelry
  • Antique Jewelry
  • Diamonds
  • Rubies
  • Sapphires
  • Emeralds
  • Male Wedding Rings
  • Female Wedding Rings
  • Engagement Rings
  • Bracelets
  • Earrings
  • Necklaces
  • Gold
  • Silver
  • Platinum
  • All-Things Rolex

James Island’s Most Trusted Jewelry Store

We are proud and grateful to have served thousands of customers looking for quality jewelry and a relaxed, no-pressure atmosphere. We would love the opportunity to speak with you face-to-face so that we can learn what you’re looking for and what you love about jewelry. Whether you’re looking for a custom diamond engagement ring or need friendly advice about what looks right, we are here help.

Latest News in James Island

Lowcountry yacht club keeps rule in place banning women from being members

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The James Island Yacht Club was founded in 1898. But more than 100 years later, the by-laws regarding its male-only policy have yet to change.According to a statement from the James Island Yacht Club, the female spouses of the members have become more “involved and are an integral part of the Club,” but they are not considered members.“The James Island Yacht Club is a family-focused social organization run by its membership as outlined by the Club by-laws. Potential new members o...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The James Island Yacht Club was founded in 1898. But more than 100 years later, the by-laws regarding its male-only policy have yet to change.

According to a statement from the James Island Yacht Club, the female spouses of the members have become more “involved and are an integral part of the Club,” but they are not considered members.

“The James Island Yacht Club is a family-focused social organization run by its membership as outlined by the Club by-laws. Potential new members of our Club must be sponsored by a current resident member. Our Club was founded in 1898 as a male-only organization and over time females have become more and more involved and are an integral part of the Club. Females of the Club have full access and use of all JIYC facilities and participation in all social activities.”

Females are only offered access to the Club facilities and able to participate in social activities if their male significant other is a member.

In 2020, the members of the club voted to potentially change the club by-laws to make women full members. But when the men voted, it did not pass.

“While this motion was thoroughly debated it did not garner the necessary % of votes required to change the Club by-laws. The by-laws govern our Club and changing them is the only way to change our membership practices. Proposals to change the Club by-laws are brought up from time to time, often taking multiple attempts to garner sufficient membership support for implementation.”

The Chair for the City of Charleston Commission on Women Jennet Robinson Alterman calls this discrimination.

“It’s discrimination, plain and simply,” Robinson Alterman said. “And although it is legal discrimination because it’s a private club and they’re pretty much allowed to do what they want to, just because it’s legal doesn’t mean it’s right.”

The CEO of South Carolina Women and Leadership Barbara Rackes says she is surprised to learn there are still clubs in South Carolina with these types of laws.

“What do you think about your daughters,” Rackes asked. “Are you going to tell her that in order for her to be a member she has to be married? Do you really want you daughter to be precluded from joining the club you like so much?”

As the by-laws of the club currently stand, no women will be able to vote on this matter until the men-only members vote to include them.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Editorial: We know what’s polluting James Island Creek. Now we need to fix it.

We finally know the main source of pollution that’s fouling James Island Creek: It’s not coming from Charleston’s Plum Island sewer treatment plant or from pet waste or even from wild animals but from the many faulty septic tanks along the creek banks. Now it’s time to address the problem and restore the health of the scenic creek.The work won’t be quick or cheap; it will take years and likely cost several million dollars. But it’s necessary, and we’re encouraged that local and state officials...

We finally know the main source of pollution that’s fouling James Island Creek: It’s not coming from Charleston’s Plum Island sewer treatment plant or from pet waste or even from wild animals but from the many faulty septic tanks along the creek banks. Now it’s time to address the problem and restore the health of the scenic creek.

The work won’t be quick or cheap; it will take years and likely cost several million dollars. But it’s necessary, and we’re encouraged that local and state officials say they are more focused on getting it done. We urge residents of James Island and beyond to hold them to their word.

The nonprofit Charleston Waterkeeper has done tests for bacteria counts in the creek for nine years to sound an alarm about the ongoing contamination. Last year, several local governments formed a task force to tackle the problem. That has led to a new watershed management plan, already approved by the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control, that offers a detailed picture regarding the sources of pollution and the actions necessary to improve water quality.

Adopting that plan would be a small but important first step for the city of Charleston, the town of James Island, the James Island Public Service District and Charleston County. Their support will be crucial to seeking grants and raising other funds to get more homes off septic tanks and hooked up to sewer lines. Other key actions include promoting the proper maintenance of septic tanks in the interim, as well as studying the island’s sewer lines to ensure they’re not part of the problem.

“My read is the public in and around James Island Creek is in a place where they’re looking for action,” said Charleston Waterkeeper executive director Andrew Wunderley, who is part of the task force. “I think what the public really wants to see is here’s something we’re doing to reduce the bacteria discharges into James Island Creek. And here’s another thing we’re doing. And here’s a third thing we’re doing.”

Aside from the major infrastructure work, the new plan also mentions more modest steps, such as pet waste management programs, educational campaigns and incentives to reduce paving on residential and commercial properties along the creek.

These deserve to be explored to see if their potential payoff would be worth their more nominal costs.

Charleston City Councilman Ross Appel said elected officials ultimately must find a way to raise the necessary money to do the larger work on septic tanks and sewer lines. “At the end of the day, I see this, at its core, as just as much of a public infrastructure issue as our stormwater system and roads.”

To that end, the task force leaders need to think beyond the design of specific projects and figure out how those projects might be paid for and how much affected homeowners ultimately will be expected to pay to hook into the new systems and pay their monthly sewer bills.

DHEC rewrote its regulations this year to give a more accurate picture for those who swim, kayak and fish in our waterways. Its change held all recreational saltwater bodies to the same standard for bacteria counts, so Shem and James Island creeks no longer were deemed OK even if they had 80% more bacteria than other bodies of water, such as the Ashley River.

That was a positive step. The new study pinpointing the pollution problem in James Island Creek is another one. We now know the problem and how to address it, so it’s time to do just that.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Two feet washed up on South Carolina beaches months apart. Now coroner has an ID

A right foot still inside a green and black running shoe was found off the coast of South Carolina last year. Five months later, county officials said, the left one surfaced in a different location.Now officials believe they have positively identified the owner.The feet belonged to 57-year-old Janet Robinson, who was last seen in...

A right foot still inside a green and black running shoe was found off the coast of South Carolina last year. Five months later, county officials said, the left one surfaced in a different location.

Now officials believe they have positively identified the owner.

The feet belonged to 57-year-old Janet Robinson, who was last seen in August 2020, Charleston County Coroner Bobbi Jo O’Neal told reporters during a news conference broadcast by WCBD on Wednesday. O’Neal said it took months of “advanced level forensic science” using DNA testing to find an ID.

Robinson’s death remains under investigation. Law enforcement and family members are asking anyone who might have information to come forward.

“They’re very saddened to learn that their loved one — their sister and their daughter and their mom — is never coming home,” O’Neal said of the family. “But, at the same time, there’s comfort in at least knowing there’s an answer.”

Officials said Robinson had likely been dead for at least four weeks based on the condition of the first foot that was found. She was last seen in the Charleston area on Aug. 3, 2020.

Her right foot was found in a “green and black On Cloud sneaker-type shoe” near Fort Sumter on Oct. 25, O’Neal said. On Cloud is a popular brand of running shoes, and Fort Sumter is located on an island in the Charleston harbor.

The coroner’s office sent a DNA sample from the foot to the University of North Texas Center for Human Identification in Fort Worth about a week after it was found. O’Neal said they hoped to receive a DNA profile that could be uploaded into CODIS, the FBI’s national DNA database.

Then, on March 17, Robinson’s left foot in the same style sneaker was found on James Island.

Citing a “huge backlog in forensic DNA,” O’Neal said the chief deputy coroner began researching ways they could do some genetic DNA testing. The coroner’s office subsequently sent a DNA sample to a company in Texas for a genealogical profile.

Within three months, O’Neal said, they had a match.

The lab compared the sample to databases where people voluntarily upload their DNA and found someone they believed to be a sibling. Officials in South Carolina then reached out to the person, who confirmed they submitted a consumer DNA test in January 2019 and had a biological sister living in Charleston who went missing.

That sister was identified as Robinson.

According to the coroner’s office, Robinson was from Mississippi but moved to the Charleston area to be close to family. Law enforcement believes she lived in the Goose Creek area for a time but had moved to Charleston when she disappeared.

O’Neal said Robinson had been discharged from a local hospital before she went missing.

The two feet did not appear to be injured, and O’Neal said they likely became separated from the body by “natural processes.”

Feet have been known to wash up in the Pacific Northwest on a somewhat regular basis — at least 15 have been found on the shore of Salish Sea, Vox reported. That’s because human bodies come apart at the joints in the water, and sneakers serve as a kind of flotation device that can be easily wash them to shore.

Law enforcement is hoping to find additional remains and relying on tips from the public to help solve what happened to Robinson.

“At this point we’re sort of stuck, ” O’Neal said.

Anyone with information is asked to call coroner’s officer at 843-746-4030 or Charleston County Sheriff’s Department.

This story was originally published October 6, 2021 6:45 PM.

SC closes on nuns’ James Island waterfront property for $23M with plans to make a park

JAMES ISLAND — The sale is complete for a piece of waterfront property between a suburban subdivision and a collection of marine labs, and there’s high hopes the state could turn the property into a centerpiece park.In June, a group of lawmakers announced they intended to bid on a 23-acre property at the end of Fort Johnson Road inhabited by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy. The congregation of nuns dates back nearly two centuries in Charleston.The announcement was ...

JAMES ISLAND — The sale is complete for a piece of waterfront property between a suburban subdivision and a collection of marine labs, and there’s high hopes the state could turn the property into a centerpiece park.

In June, a group of lawmakers announced they intended to bid on a 23-acre property at the end of Fort Johnson Road inhabited by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy. The congregation of nuns dates back nearly two centuries in Charleston.

The announcement was a surprise at the time.

State Sen. Chip Campsen, R-Isle of Palms, told The Post and Courier in an interview this week that lawmakers only noticed the property was for sale as the window to bid was rapidly closing, and that the state’s formal offer came after that period had ended.

The state’s offer was not the highest, but it was successful, Campsen said, in part because it came without conditions that a developer might attach — like not closing until building permits are awarded.

Property records indicate the sale closed at the end of July, and the final price was $23.25 million.

The opportunity to preserve the 23-acre waterfront parcel from development, complete with views of Fort Sumter and the rest of Charleston Harbor, was a rare one, Campsen said.

He said the sisters “felt like their legacy and their stewardship of that land would be best protected, best preserved for future generations if the state bought it.”

The property will be owned by the Department of Natural Resources, which runs the marine lab next door, and managed by the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism, which might one day rent out the convent building on the site.

Campsen said the 24 rooms would probably have to be expanded for future visitors.

Sam Queen, a spokeswoman for PRT, said that a public planning process for the site is expected to begin early next year.

“It definitely is a unique situation and one we’re excited about,” she said.

DNR, meanwhile, had already been doing some work near the site, cooperating with the sisters there to use oyster reefs to stabilize erosion on the waterfront, said Erin Weeks, an agency spokeswoman. Most of the parcel is forested, with a residence building and a chapel on site.

Campsen said he was excited for the planning process to incorporate the existing DNR land, and that the two parcels could be at least partially tied together into one park. It’s a historically significant area — the point at the end of Fort Johnson Road is where the first shots of the Civil War were fired on Fort Sumter.

In the meantime, nothing will change on the land any time soon. As a condition of the sale, the sisters are allowed to stay on the property through at least June 2022, with an option to extend to December 2022.

The nuns were looking to move as their members age and new women don’t join the ranks. Sister Mary Joseph Ritter confirmed that the congregation planned to relocate to the Bishop Gadsden retirement home, but the transition wouldn’t come until next year.

“We’re on the waiting list, just like everybody else,” she said.

The congregation didn’t have any further details on the move, she said, but would have more to say in the coming months about how they hope to preserve their legacy.

Twelve members remain among the Sisters of Charity, a congregation that has ministered in Charleston since 1829. Through its history, the group ran a school for free children of color in the 1840s, cared for both Union and Confederate wounded soldiers during the Civil War, and founded the hospital that would evolve into the Roper-St. Francis health care system.

The sisters moved to their current home on James Island in the 1950s.

Roundabout proposal for James Island intersection tossed by committee

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - After years of discussion of plans to improve an intersection on James Island, the project is now moving in a different direction.In a 5-3 vote Thursday evening, the Charleston County Council’s Planning and Public Works Committee rescinded its previous approval of a plan to build a dog bone-shaped stretched roundabout at the intersection of Riverland Drive and Central Park Road.The plan had previously gotten the thumbs up from the council, but Councilwoman Jenny Honeycutt, a proponent of the pl...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - After years of discussion of plans to improve an intersection on James Island, the project is now moving in a different direction.

In a 5-3 vote Thursday evening, the Charleston County Council’s Planning and Public Works Committee rescinded its previous approval of a plan to build a dog bone-shaped stretched roundabout at the intersection of Riverland Drive and Central Park Road.

The plan had previously gotten the thumbs up from the council, but Councilwoman Jenny Honeycutt, a proponent of the plan, said a change in council membership led to a change in priorities.

“What became clear is there were a number of competing priorities: that of preserving the neighborhood and the trees and the aesthetics as well as preserving property that would have to be taken in both alternatives that were presented,” she said.

Councilman C. Brantley Moody said while he thought the dog bone was the best idea, the council needs to move forward to make some improvements to what he described as a “terrible interchange” sooner rather than later.

“I trust this compromise will improve safety, that it’ll improve the connectivity you’re talking about with the sidewalks. I hope that the money we’ve spent to date is not lost; I think it can be used and incorporated into this new compromise,” he said.

It had been the preferred plan because, according to an earlier analysis, it best met the overall goals, including best reducing crashes with injuries, but it has divided some area residents.

Some – including multiple neighbors Live 5 News spoke with Thursday who didn’t want to go on camera -- would rather see a stop light which they argue would be less confusing and would not involve the county taking over as much property. Others supported the roundabout as a safer alternative.

Instead, the committee moved toward a compromise that would see improved bike and pedestrian facilities all the way to James Island County Park and Woodland Shores Road as well as flashing lights to alert drivers to the stop sign. The compromise passed with seven members in favor and one opposed.

One councilmember proposed reducing the speed limit on Riverland Drive between Maybank Highway and Camp Road, but since Riverland Drive is a state highway, the state would need to sign off on that idea.

Honeycutt said the compromise is better than nothing but that would not provide much in the way of improved traffic flow.

Some parts of the earlier alternatives – mainly the pedestrian improvements – would be able to be salvaged, she added, meaning the years put into studying other options would not be a waste.

The updated plan now moves to the full county council, which is set to meet on Tuesday.

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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