Jewelry stores in North Charleston, SC

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We want like to take a moment to welcome you to Colucci’s Jewelers – North Charleston’s premier jewelry store for more than 60 years. We are so happy that you decided to visit our website! We hope that while you’re here, you will begin to get a sense of why so many customers choose Colucci’s Jewelers over other jewelry stores in North Charleston, SC.
In an industry known for snobby salespeople and overpriced items, Colucci’s Jewelers brings warm smiles and affordable prices to jewelry shoppers in the Lowcountry. Unlike other jewelers in North Charleston, the Colucci team focuses on providing customers with an unmatched jewelry experience, from the moment they pull into our parking lot to the minute they leave our showroom. We believe our customers deserve special attention, and our goal is to provide them with friendly, personalized service every time they visit.

The Colucci Difference

As a certified jeweler with more than 50 years in the industry, Stefan Colucci has built his reputation on excellence and execution. With a wealth of knowledge and a passion for precision, Stefan pours his heart into every custom-made piece of jewelry, repair, restoration, and appraisal that he completes at Colucci’s Jewelers. With consistent craftsmanship and impressive attention to detail, Stefan’s ability to cater to all your jewelry needs will exceed your expectations every time.
While Stefan focuses on creating unforgettable custom jewelry for you or your loved one, his wife Summer specializes in customer service. Kind, patient, and knowledgeable in her own right, Summer will take all the time necessary to answer your questions and guide you through the jewelry selection process. Whether you’re stressed out looking for the perfect diamond engagement ring or need to restore a priceless family heirloom, Summer will make sure you receive the attention you deserve.
When you shop at Colucci’s Jewelry, understand that we will never try to pressure you into a purchase or provide you with lackluster service if you’re “window shopping.” We treat each of our customers with the same exceptional care, whether they are repeat clients or new faces.
Colucci’s is a name you can trust – there’s a reason we were voted Best Jeweler in 2019 by Readers Choice!

We offer several different jewelry styles and services in North Charleston, from breathtaking engagement rings to extensive repairs. Keep reading to learn more about a few of our specialties.

Diamond Engagement Rings in North Charleston

Proposing to the love of your life is one of the most beautiful, memorable moments that two people will ever share as a couple. An engagement ring symbolizes love and acceptance; it epitomizes trust and commitment. While no two proposals will ever be exactly the same, there is one constant that will always remain true: the diamond engagement ring you choose from Colucci’s Jewelers will give you a lifetime of pleasure and contentment.
We understand that choosing the right engagement ring is one of the most important decisions you can make. That is why we pair the finest engagement jewelry in North Charleston, SC, with one-on-one showings and helpful advice – to ensure that you discover dazzling rings at an affordable price. With the Colucci team by your side, we take second-guessing out of the equation, so you can focus on popping the question with confidence. After all, a diamond engagement ring is meant to be cherished for a lifetime!

Factors to Consider Before Buying an Engagement Ring

We find that taking the time to give our clients as much information as possible makes their experience easier and more enjoyable. Before you visit our store in person, consider the following factors when choosing an engagement ring:

  • Ring Size: Knowing your fiancée’s ring size is crucial, especially if you’re planning a surprise without her knowing. Borrow one of her rings and bring it to Colucci’s Jewelers, and we will measure free of charge. For the perfect fit, we can also resize her ring when the time is right.
  • Jewelry Preference: Sapphire? Ruby? Emerald? Diamond? At Colucci Jewelry, we have a wide range of gemstones to choose from which to choose, as well as settings and metal types. Ask your fiancée’s friends or family for tips, or better yet, ask her yourself if you can do so without spoiling the surprise.
  • 4 C’s: The four C’s represent color, clarity, cut, and carat weight. If you’re just starting your search, this system might be foreign to you, but it is a trusted grading system used throughout the world. We recommend you visit Colucci’s Jewelers for a quick education on this system, so you can find a quality diamond at a price that fits within your budget.

On-Site Jewelry Services in North Charleston

With regular care and maintenance, your piece of fine jewelry from Colucci’s Jewelers will give you a lifetime of enjoyment. Whether your favorite emerald necklace needs cleaning or a small diamond in your engagement ring is loose, we are happy to help. With more than 50 years of experience as Colucci’s Jewelers’ in-house repair expert, Stefan Colucci will handle your jewelry with care and compassion. Stefan is also highly skilled at creating designer jewelry in North Charleston, SC. If you have a grand idea for a custom jewelry project, Stefan will consult with you one-on-one to turn your dream into reality.

In addition to the above services, Colucci Jewelers also offers:

  • Class Rings
  • Cash for Gold
  • Gold Dealer Services
  • Consignment Services
  • Custom Diamond Engagement Rings
  • Luxury Watches
  • Luxury Watch Repair
  • Rhodium Plating
  • Same-Day Jewelry Repair
  • Gold Coins for Sale
  • Restringing

Don’t risk sending your jewelry off to another state or country to be repaired by someone you can’t see or talk to – as the premier on-site jewelry store in North Charleston, we will handle all of your jewelry needs in person, with hard work and a smile.

If you need to get your fine jewelry appraised for insurance purposes, Colucci’s Jewelers can help.

It’s a great idea to get your jewelry appraised periodically. As the years pass along, the value of your precious metals and gemstones can fluctuate. If your last appraisal was more than two years ago, you could run into problems with your insurance coverage. If your jewelry is insured for less than its replacement value, you could lose a substantial amount of money if it is stolen or lost.

To help prevent situations like this from happening, our on-site jeweler Stefan Colucci will provide you with an up-to-date appraisal report based on your jewelry’s current market value. That way, you can update your insurance accordingly.

We also specialize in estate jewelry appraisals, so you know exactly how much your old jewelry is worth if you are thinking of selling.

Our appraisal services include:

  • Diamond Appraisals
  • Insurance Appraisals
  • Court Appraisals
  • Estate Jewelry Appraisals
  • Cash Offer for Appraised Jewelry

Jewelry Appraisal Services in North Charleston

Sell Your Jewelry in North Charleston

Selling jewelry from years past can be a hard experience. Estate jewelry, in particular, can have sentimental value attached and can be hard to sell. This is because jewelry is often a symbol of achievement or affection, such as your class ring from high school or your grandmother’s wedding band. At Colucci’s Jewelers, we understand the connection to old jewelry and appreciate the memories and value you have with these antique pieces.

In addition to the personal value, antique and estate jewelry can be quite valuable from a monetary standpoint. Estate jewelry is extremely popular in this day and age. Many Lowcountry locals are selling their vintage pieces to trusted jewelry stores in North Charleston, SC, like Colucci’s Jewelers.

Many customers choose to sell their jewelry to Colucci’s Jewelers because we offer an intimate, honest experience – something that you will certainly not receive if you list your jewelry for sale on an internet marketplace. We will be upfront with you every step of the way to help separate personal value from monetary value, and will present you with a fair offer to consider.

If you are interested in selling your jewelry, we encourage you to visit our showroom to meet our staff and get an accurate appraisal of your jewelry’s worth.

We buy a multitude of different jewelry, including:
  • Estate Jewelry
  • Custom Jewelry
  • Antique Jewelry
  • Diamonds
  • Rubies
  • Sapphires
  • Emeralds
  • Male Wedding Rings
  • Female Wedding Rings
  • Engagement Rings
  • Bracelets
  • Earrings
  • Necklaces
  • Gold
  • Silver
  • Platinum
  • All-Things Rolex

North Charleston’s Most Trusted Jewelry Store

We are proud and grateful to have served thousands of customers looking for quality jewelry and a relaxed, no-pressure atmosphere. We would love the opportunity to speak with you face-to-face so that we can learn what you’re looking for and what you love about jewelry. Whether you’re looking for a custom diamond engagement ring or need friendly advice about what looks right, we are here help.

Latest News in North Charleston

New mental health facility will begin construction in December

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Trident Health System will break ground in December on a new freestanding behavioral health hospital. It will be the first of its kind in the Lowcountry in the last 30 years. Currently, there are about 250 beds for mental health patients in the Lowcountry. Those beds are provided by Trident Health System, the Medical University of South Carolina and Palmetto Behavioral Health. But, advocates for mental health say that number is not enough. "I think it's relevant now because it h...

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Trident Health System will break ground in December on a new freestanding behavioral health hospital. It will be the first of its kind in the Lowcountry in the last 30 years.

Currently, there are about 250 beds for mental health patients in the Lowcountry. Those beds are provided by Trident Health System, the Medical University of South Carolina and Palmetto Behavioral Health.

But, advocates for mental health say that number is not enough.

"I think it's relevant now because it has been relevant for years. It's been relevant for as long as I've been in Charleston, that we need more access to psychiatric care. As the population has grown, it has become even more relevant," said Dr. Jeffrey Culver, a psychiatrist and the medical director of behavioral health at Trident Health System.

But, mental health care goes beyond hospital beds.

"The need I think is great. It's across the full spectrum from assessment therapy, intensive treatment and treatment in a hospital based setting," said Dr. Culver.

The new behavioral health facility at Trident Health system will provide an additional 60 inpatient beds, with the ability to expand, plus more.

"The new facility will have within it a full assessment center. To asses the need for inpatient and outpatient treatment programs. We will start with 60 inpatient psychiatric beds. We plan to treat everyone from geriatric to adolescent," said Culver.

Kelly Troyer is an advocate for mental health. Her son, Alex, has a mental health condition.

"He has a developmental delay and high functioning autism," said Kelly.

Kelly said the journey to find adequate care for her son has been a challenge.

"With him growing up it was very frustrating for me to get help for him. And I thought, 'We have insurance, money, and resources. If I can't find help, then how is everyone else finding help?'" she said.

But things have improved over the years, although there is still a long way to go.

Kelly said she wants her son to be seen as a person, and not as his condition.

"When he is not okay, I want him to get treatment so he can be the best, highest functioning, tax-paying, gamer, iPhone-loving, lady-loving young man," said Troyer.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness is a resource that is available to everyone.

The nonprofit has affiliates all across the country, including in Charleston.

NAMI is able to provide advocacy for mental health patients with everything from treatment to support groups.

If you need help, call NAMI Charleston at 843-284-3091.

Steely Dan announce 2021 tour & live album

Steely Dan have announced a fall 2021 live dates which they're calling the "Absolutely Normal Tour '21." The tour kicks off October 8 in Miami, and includes stops in Orlando, Charlotte, Richmond, Baltimore, Philly, Morristown, Port Chester, Boston and more. All dates are listed below. There are four nights at Morristown, NJ's ...

Steely Dan have announced a fall 2021 live dates which they're calling the "Absolutely Normal Tour '21." The tour kicks off October 8 in Miami, and includes stops in Orlando, Charlotte, Richmond, Baltimore, Philly, Morristown, Port Chester, Boston and more. All dates are listed below.

There are four nights at Morristown, NJ's Mayo Performing Arts Center on November 3, 4, 6 & 7, and there are two shows at Port Chester's Capitol Theatre on November 9 & 10. Tickets for all dates of the tour go on sale Friday, July 30 at 10 AM local time with various presale starting beforehand.

Meanwhile, Steely Dan also have a new live album on the way, Northeast Corridor: Steely Dan Live! which was recorded at New York City’s Beacon Theatre, The Met Philadelphia, & more. Frontman Donald Fagen will also release The Nightfly Live, which was recorded with the Steely Dan band. Both albums are out digitally on September 24 and physically on October 1. Pre-order here and check out the tracklists -- and listen to "Reelin' in the Years" and "I.G.Y." -- below.

Steely Dan - 2021 Tour Dates
October 5th – Miami Beach, FL @ The Fillmore Miami Beach at Jackie Gleason Theater
October 6th – Miami Beach, FL @ The Fillmore Miami Beach at Jackie Gleason Theater
October 8th – Miami Beach, FL @ The Fillmore Miami Beach at Jackie Gleason Theater
October 9th – Miami Beach, FL @ The Fillmore Miami Beach at Jackie Gleason Theater
October 12th – Orlando, FL @ Dr Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
October 13th – Orlando, FL @ Dr Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
October 15th – St. Petersburg, FL @ Duke Energy Center for the Arts – Mahaffey Theater
October 16th – St. Petersburg, FL @ Duke Energy Center for the Arts – Mahaffey Theater
October 19th – Jacksonville, FL @ Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts – Moran Theater
October 20th – North Charleston, SC @ North Charleston Performing Arts Center
October 22nd – Charlotte, NC @ Ovens Auditorium
October 23rd – Richmond, VA @ Altria Theater
October 25th – Baltimore, MD @ Hippodrome Theatre at France-Merrick Performing Arts
October 27th – Philadelphia, PA @ The Met Philadelphia
October 29th – Philadelphia, PA @ The Met Philadelphia
October 30th – Philadelphia, PA @ The Met Philadelphia
November 1st – Red Bank, NJ @ Hackensack Meridian Health Theatre at the Count Basie Center
November 3d – Morristown, NJ @ Mayo Performing Arts Center
November 4th – Morristown, NJ @ Mayo Performing Arts Center
November 6th – Morristown, NJ @ Mayo Performing Arts Center
November 7th – Morristown, NJ @ Mayo Performing Arts Center
November 9th – Port Chester, NY @ The Capitol Theatre
November 10th – Port Chester, NY @ The Capitol Theatre
November 13th – Wallingford, CT @ Toyota Oakdale Theatre
November 14th – Bethlehem, PA @ The Wind Creek Event Center
November 17th – Boston, MA @ Orpheum Theatre presented by Citizens
November 19th – Boston, MA @ Orpheum Theatre presented by Citizens
November 20th – Boston, MA @ Orpheum Theatre presented by Citizens

Northeast Corridor: Steely Dan Live! tracklist:
Disc 1:
1. Black Cow (Side A)
2. Kid Charlemagne (Side A)
3. Rikki Don't Lose That Number (Side A)
4. Hey Nineteen (Side B)
5. Any Major Dude Will Tell You (Side B)
6. Glamour Profession (Side B)

Disc 2:
1. Things I Miss the Most (Side A)
2. Aja (Side A)
3. Peg (Side A)
4. Bodhisattva (Side B)
5. Reelin' in the Years (Side B)
6. A Man Ain't Supposed to Cry (Side B)

Donald Fagen - The Nightfly Live tracklist:
1. I.G.Y (Side A)
2. Green Flower Street (Side A)
3. Ruby Baby (Side A)
4. Maxine (Side A)
5. New Frontier (Side B)
6. The Nightfly (Side B)
7. The Goodbye Look (Side B)
8. Walk Between the Raindrops (Side B)

DHEC to host community vaccine clinics July 26 – August 1

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control will provide vaccination clinics at sites across the Lowcountry next week. The Moderna and Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccines are currently available for people 18 and older, and the Pfizer vaccine is for ages 12 and up. COVID-19 vaccinations are free. You won’t pay deductibles, co-insurance, or co-payments. Walk-ins welcome, or make an appointment for a DHEC clinic by ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control will provide vaccination clinics at sites across the Lowcountry next week.

The Moderna and Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccines are currently available for people 18 and older, and the Pfizer vaccine is for ages 12 and up.

COVID-19 vaccinations are free. You won’t pay deductibles, co-insurance, or co-payments. Walk-ins welcome, or make an appointment for a DHEC clinic by clicking here or calling 866-365-8110.

Community Partner Vaccine ClinicsSome non-DHEC vaccine providers may ask for your insurance information or an identification card, but you are not required to provide these in order to receive your vaccine and cannot be turned away. To make your appointment with a non-DHEC clinic, register online with the provider or call the provider directly.

SC communities to receive part of $26 billion opioid settlement tied to epidemic

A preliminary $26 billion settlement was announced July 21 with Johnson & Johnson and the nation’s “Big Three” opioid distributors: AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson. If approved, many South Carolina communities could receive payments as early as the first quarter of 2022 and together would reap as much as $350 million from the drugmakers over the next two decades. The settlement includes 3,795 communities across the country within 48 states that the opioid epidemic has impacted. Fifty-four o...

A preliminary $26 billion settlement was announced July 21 with Johnson & Johnson and the nation’s “Big Three” opioid distributors: AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson.

If approved, many South Carolina communities could receive payments as early as the first quarter of 2022 and together would reap as much as $350 million from the drugmakers over the next two decades.

The settlement includes 3,795 communities across the country within 48 states that the opioid epidemic has impacted. Fifty-four of those 3,795 communities are from South Carolina, including Charleston, Berkeley and Dorchester counties. The settlement also includes the city of Charleston, North Charleston, Mount Pleasant and Summerville individually.

Joe Rice, co-founder of the Mount Pleasant law firm Motley Rice LLC, was a lead counsel for negotiations in dividing the settlement among these communities.

Rice and other counsel wanted to create a settlement that could be accepted by different local governments and would work for all of the affected communities, he wrote in a July 21 blog post.

“The agreement announced today isn’t perfect, but it is a way to provide assistance to states and subdivisions if they agree to the settlement, as well as changes in conduct for these companies regarding their handling of prescription narcotics,” Rice wrote.

The opioid distributors were accused of ignoring red flags and failing their duty to report suspicious orders and the foreseeable black market of addictive opioid drugs.

AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson have agreed to pay a total settlement amount of $21 billion over 18 years. Through the settlement, the companies would not admit any wrongdoing.

“The distributors may not admit to any wrongdoing, but they agreed to pay $21 billion,” Rice said. “You tell me if you think they’re just being generous.”

Johnson & Johnson will pay $5 billion over seven years, Rice said. The company also agreed to exit the opioid business, he said.

Rice said he supported the settlement.

“The important thing is, with the settlement, the money starts now,” Rice said. “And we need the money now. In delaying the money two to three years while trying to get a trial date, the problem is going to be so much worse. These cases are not guaranteed winners, and they are also extremely expensive.”

The settlement is subject to change and could even be scrapped altogether. States have until Aug. 21 to decide whether they will participate in the settlements. The pharmaceutical companies then have 14 days to each determine if they will proceed with the payment.

If the pharmaceutical companies proceed with the settlement, the 3,795 communities each have 120 days to decide whether they will participate in receiving their portion of the settlement. From there, the participating states and pharmaceutical companies must reaffirm their decision to proceed with the settlement.

If all communities in South Carolina were to accept the settlement, the state would receive approximately $350 million over the next two decades, Rice said. For all settlement recipients, 85 percent of the funds are restricted to abating the opioid epidemic.

“You can’t look at this as to what a small community is going to get,” he said. “These epidemics don’t stay within their zip code. We need help uniformly statewide.”

In the settlement, the companies also agree to significantly change their business operations regarding how narcotics are handled, tracked and analyzed, Rice wrote.

The settlement comes after drug dose deaths between May 2019 and 2020 increased more than 20 percent in South Carolina, according to the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control. Synthetic opioid deaths, in particular, increased about 38 percent from June 2019 to May 2020.

The increases in drug overdose deaths appear to have accelerated during the COVID-19 pandemic, DHEC reported.

“Now, as recently confirmed by new data from the CDC, we have an opioid crisis compounded by a global pandemic, so timing is critical to get assistance to our communities,” Rice wrote in his blog post.

Aside from the settlement, other cases continue against other opioid industry defendants, including pharmacies. This proposed settlement does not resolve these cases working through the court system.

In a separate announcement, the American Medical Association urged advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a letter dated July 16 to overhaul the CDC’s current guidelines on opioid prescriptions.

The AMA holds that current restrictions are “devastating for patients with pain” and have harmed those who suffer from cancer, sickle cell disease and other painful conditions. The group also pointed out that the nation’s current opioid epidemic is no longer being driven by prescriptions, but instead by “heroin and illicitly manufactured fentanyl, fentanyl analogs, and stimulants.”

Midlands voters voice redistricting concerns to SC senators. How you can participate

One woman asked South Carolina senators Tuesday night to look closely at Saluda County when they begin to redraw the district lines for the chamber’s 46 members in the next month or so to reduce the number of senators who represent the county of fewer than 21,000 residents — currently three. Another man of the Sikh faith urged senators to ensure that the nearly 150 businesses owned and operated by the Sikh and Indian communities on Decker Boulevard in northeast Columbia — known as Richland County’s internationa...

One woman asked South Carolina senators Tuesday night to look closely at Saluda County when they begin to redraw the district lines for the chamber’s 46 members in the next month or so to reduce the number of senators who represent the county of fewer than 21,000 residents — currently three.

Another man of the Sikh faith urged senators to ensure that the nearly 150 businesses owned and operated by the Sikh and Indian communities on Decker Boulevard in northeast Columbia — known as Richland County’s international corridor — are kept together.

“So whenever you redraw those lines, please consider, keep in mind that we are immigrants. Any of you in the political process, there (is) not any member who looks like me ...,” District 22 resident Amarjit Singh, a teacher at historically Black university Benedict College, said, referring to the make up of the state Legislature. “So consider our minority rights at the same time so that we can freely be a part of this process with the other communities.”

Voters from 10 Midlands area counties were encouraged to speak Tuesday night to voice community concerns that could help senators as they begin to redraw district lines, based on the 2020 U.S. Census population figures. Not only does that data decide whether a state loses or gains a seat in the U.S. House — South Carolina did neither — but it helps indicate in part where the flow of federal dollars should go.

Roughly 30 people spoke Tuesday, most from the Columbia area, but few centered their comments on how the once-in-a-decade process could impact their community.

Most of the public who attended voiced concern about transparency and asked that, moving forward, lawmakers create an independent commission to draw the maps. Others asked senators to avoid gerrymandering districts, what can tilt districts toward certain political parties and protect incumbents — a process criticized because it lessens a voter’s chance at having a say at the ballot box.

“Protecting self interest is a powerful motivator, and few things impact the self interest of legislators more than redistricting,” said Lynn Teague with the League of Women Voters South Carolina. “This shows in our current maps. A substantial majority of South Carolina’s voters had no real choice when they voted in November 2020.”

The census won’t release updated and local population data until Aug. 16, a delay caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. But what lawmakers do know is South Carolina’s population is growing. The census showed the state grew by more than 10.7% since 2010, bumping the state’s population to more than 5.1 million people.

The hearing in Columbia Tuesday was the first of 10 hearings the special Senate panel will hold across the state, with the second on Wednesday in Sumter and the third in Rock Hill on Thursday. All meetings are scheduled to start at 6:30 p.m.

The final meeting is scheduled in Aiken County on Aug. 12.

While the Senate is responsible for redrawing their maps — based on 111,270 people per district — the House will be focused on their own and hold separate meetings. The House’s first organizational hearing will be held next Tuesday.

The two chambers will collectively work on the U.S. House districts.

To join the Senate’s email list to hear about upcoming meetings, residents can send their name, telephone number and email to redistricting@scsenate.gov. To speak at a hearing, email redistricting@scsenate.gov, call 803-212-6634 or sign up in person.

The Senate will hold nine more meetings across the state to take testimony. They are:

▪ Wednesday, July 28, Central Carolina Technical College in Sumter

For these counties: Clarendon, Kershaw, Lee, Sumter and Williamsburg

▪ Thursday, July 29, York Technical College in Rock Hill

For these counties: Cherokee, Chester, Chesterfield, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lancaster, Newberry, Union and York

▪ Monday, Aug. 2, Greenville Technical College in Greenville

For these counties: Abbeville, Anderson, Cherokee, Greenwood, Laurens, Oconee, Pickens, Spartanburg and Union

▪ Tuesday, Aug. 3, Florence-Darlington Technical College in Florence

For these counties: Chesterfield, Clarendon, Darlington, Dillon, Florence, Georgetown, Horry, Lee, Marion, Marlboro, Sumter and Williamsburg

▪ Wednesday, Aug. 4, Auditorium in MacLean Hall at Technical College of the Lowcountry in Beaufort

For these counties: Beaufort, Colleton, Hampton and Jasper

▪ Monday, Aug. 9, Orangeburg-Calhoun Technical College in Orangeburg

For these counties: Bamberg, Barnwell, Calhoun and Orangeburg

▪ Tuesday, Aug. 10, Trident Technical College in North Charleston

For these counties: Beaufort, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Dorchester, Georgetown, Hampton, Jasper and Orangeburg

▪ Wednesday, Aug. 11, Horry-Georgetown Technical College in Conway

For these counties: Dillon, Georgetown, Horry, Marion, Marlboro and Williamsburg

▪ Thursday, Aug. 12, Aiken Technical College in Graniteville

For these counties: Aiken, Allendale, Bamberg, Barnwell, Edgefield, Hampton, Lexington, McCormick, Orangeburg and Saluda

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