Colucci’s Jewelers. | 10016 Dorchester rd Summerville SC 29485

Jewelry stores in Rock Hill, SC

Ask Us Anything!

✆ 843-270-2080

Quick Quote

We want like to take a moment to welcome you to Colucci’s Jewelers – Rock Hill’s premier jewelry store for more than 60 years. We are so happy that you decided to visit our website! We hope that while you’re here, you will begin to get a sense of why so many customers choose Colucci’s Jewelers over other jewelry stores in Rock Hill, SC.
In an industry known for snobby salespeople and overpriced items, Colucci’s Jewelers brings warm smiles and affordable prices to jewelry shoppers in the Lowcountry. Unlike other jewelers in Rock Hill, the Colucci team focuses on providing customers with an unmatched jewelry experience, from the moment they pull into our parking lot to the minute they leave our showroom. We believe our customers deserve special attention, and our goal is to provide them with friendly, personalized service every time they visit.

Service Areas

The Colucci Difference

As a certified jeweler with more than 50 years in the industry, Stefan Colucci has built his reputation on excellence and execution. With a wealth of knowledge and a passion for precision, Stefan pours his heart into every custom-made piece of jewelry, repair, restoration, and appraisal that he completes at Colucci’s Jewelers. With consistent craftsmanship and impressive attention to detail, Stefan’s ability to cater to all your jewelry needs will exceed your expectations every time.
While Stefan focuses on creating unforgettable custom jewelry for you or your loved one, his wife Summer specializes in customer service. Kind, patient, and knowledgeable in her own right, Summer will take all the time necessary to answer your questions and guide you through the jewelry selection process. Whether you’re stressed out looking for the perfect diamond engagement ring or need to restore a priceless family heirloom, Summer will make sure you receive the attention you deserve.
When you shop at Colucci’s Jewelry, understand that we will never try to pressure you into a purchase or provide you with lackluster service if you’re “window shopping.” We treat each of our customers with the same exceptional care, whether they are repeat clients or new faces.
Colucci’s is a name you can trust – there’s a reason we were voted Best Jeweler in 2019 by Readers Choice!

The Colucci Difference

We offer several different jewelry styles and services in Rock Hill, from breathtaking engagement rings to extensive repairs. Keep reading to learn more about a few of our specialties.

The Colucci Difference

Diamond Engagement Rings in Rock Hill

Proposing to the love of your life is one of the most beautiful, memorable moments that two people will ever share as a couple. An engagement ring symbolizes love and acceptance; it epitomizes trust and commitment. While no two proposals will ever be exactly the same, there is one constant that will always remain true: the diamond engagement ring you choose from Colucci’s Jewelers will give you a lifetime of pleasure and contentment.
We understand that choosing the right engagement ring is one of the most important decisions you can make. That is why we pair the finest engagement jewelry in Rock Hill, SC, with one-on-one showings and helpful advice – to ensure that you discover dazzling rings at an affordable price. With the Colucci team by your side, we take second-guessing out of the equation, so you can focus on popping the question with confidence. After all, a diamond engagement ring is meant to be cherished for a lifetime!

Factors to Consider Before Buying an Engagement Ring

We find that taking the time to give our clients as much information as possible makes their experience easier and more enjoyable. Before you visit our store in person, consider the following factors when choosing an engagement ring:

  • Ring Size: Knowing your fiancée’s ring size is crucial, especially if you’re planning a surprise without her knowing. Borrow one of her rings and bring it to Colucci’s Jewelers, and we will measure free of charge. For the perfect fit, we can also resize her ring when the time is right.
  • Jewelry Preference: Sapphire? Ruby? Emerald? Diamond? At Colucci Jewelry, we have a wide range of gemstones to choose from which to choose, as well as settings and metal types. Ask your fiancée’s friends or family for tips, or better yet, ask her yourself if you can do so without spoiling the surprise.
  • 4 C’s: The four C’s represent color, clarity, cut, and carat weight. If you’re just starting your search, this system might be foreign to you, but it is a trusted grading system used throughout the world. We recommend you visit Colucci’s Jewelers for a quick education on this system, so you can find a quality diamond at a price that fits within your budget.
Factors to Consider Before Buying an Engagement Ring

On-Site Jewelry Services in Rock Hill

On-Site Jewelry Services in Rock Hill

With regular care and maintenance, your piece of fine jewelry from Colucci’s Jewelers will give you a lifetime of enjoyment. Whether your favorite emerald necklace needs cleaning or a small diamond in your engagement ring is loose, we are happy to help. With more than 50 years of experience as Colucci’s Jewelers’ in-house repair expert, Stefan Colucci will handle your jewelry with care and compassion. Stefan is also highly skilled at creating designer jewelry in Rock Hill, SC. If you have a grand idea for a custom jewelry project, Stefan will consult with you one-on-one to turn your dream into reality.

In addition to the above services, Colucci Jewelers also offers:

  • Class Rings
  • Cash for Gold
  • Gold Dealer Services
  • Consignment Services
  • Custom Diamond Engagement Rings
  • Luxury Watches
  • Luxury Watch Repair
  • Rhodium Plating
  • Same-Day Jewelry Repair
  • Gold Coins for Sale
  • Restringing

Don’t risk sending your jewelry off to another state or country to be repaired by someone you can’t see or talk to – as the premier on-site jewelry store in Rock Hill, we will handle all of your jewelry needs in person, with hard work and a smile.

If you need to get your fine jewelry appraised for insurance purposes, Colucci’s Jewelers can help.

It’s a great idea to get your jewelry appraised periodically. As the years pass along, the value of your precious metals and gemstones can fluctuate. If your last appraisal was more than two years ago, you could run into problems with your insurance coverage. If your jewelry is insured for less than its replacement value, you could lose a substantial amount of money if it is stolen or lost.

To help prevent situations like this from happening, our on-site jeweler Stefan Colucci will provide you with an up-to-date appraisal report based on your jewelry’s current market value. That way, you can update your insurance accordingly.

We also specialize in estate jewelry appraisals, so you know exactly how much your old jewelry is worth if you are thinking of selling.

Our appraisal services include:

  • Diamond Appraisals
  • Insurance Appraisals
  • Court Appraisals
  • Estate Jewelry Appraisals
  • Cash Offer for Appraised Jewelry

Jewelry Appraisal Services in Rock Hill

Jewelry Appraisal Services in Rock Hill
On-Site Jewelry Services in Rock Hill

Sell Your Jewelry in Rock Hill

Selling jewelry from years past can be a hard experience. Estate jewelry, in particular, can have sentimental value attached and can be hard to sell. This is because jewelry is often a symbol of achievement or affection, such as your class ring from high school or your grandmother’s wedding band. At Colucci’s Jewelers, we understand the connection to old jewelry and appreciate the memories and value you have with these antique pieces.

In addition to the personal value, antique and estate jewelry can be quite valuable from a monetary standpoint. Estate jewelry is extremely popular in this day and age. Many Lowcountry locals are selling their vintage pieces to trusted jewelry stores in Rock Hill, SC, like Colucci’s Jewelers.

Many customers choose to sell their jewelry to Colucci’s Jewelers because we offer an intimate, honest experience – something that you will certainly not receive if you list your jewelry for sale on an internet marketplace. We will be upfront with you every step of the way to help separate personal value from monetary value, and will present you with a fair offer to consider.

If you are interested in selling your jewelry, we encourage you to visit our showroom to meet our staff and get an accurate appraisal of your jewelry’s worth.

We buy a multitude of different jewelry, including:
  • Estate Jewelry
  • Custom Jewelry
  • Antique Jewelry
  • Diamonds
  • Rubies
  • Sapphires
  • Emeralds
  • Male Wedding Rings
  • Female Wedding Rings
  • Engagement Rings
  • Bracelets
  • Earrings
  • Necklaces
  • Gold
  • Silver
  • Platinum
  • All-Things Rolex

Rock Hill’s Most Trusted Jewelry Store

We are proud and grateful to have served thousands of customers looking for quality jewelry and a relaxed, no-pressure atmosphere. We would love the opportunity to speak with you face-to-face so that we can learn what you’re looking for and what you love about jewelry. Whether you’re looking for a custom diamond engagement ring or need friendly advice about what looks right, we are here help.

Latest News in Rock Hill

SC Ports CEO Jim Newsome announces retirement at annual State of the Port address

Jim Newsome, CEO and president of the South Carolina Ports Authority, announced Monday that he will retire next summer.Newsome has led the agency since 2009, which handles roughly $75 billion of commerce each year. Barbara Melvin, the port’s CFO, was named his replacement and will start effective July 1, 2022. She has been with the agency for more than 20 years.The Ports Authority owns and operates several ports around the state, inc...

Jim Newsome, CEO and president of the South Carolina Ports Authority, announced Monday that he will retire next summer.

Newsome has led the agency since 2009, which handles roughly $75 billion of commerce each year. Barbara Melvin, the port’s CFO, was named his replacement and will start effective July 1, 2022. She has been with the agency for more than 20 years.

The Ports Authority owns and operates several ports around the state, including the Port of Charleston and Georgetown, where cargo ships help connect the Palmetto State to global markets, generating $63 billion in local economic impacts each year.

The organization is considered a top 10 container ports in the nation, and is responsible for one out of every 10 jobs in the state, according to its website.

“It has been my great honor to serve as CEO of South Carolina Ports,” Newsome said Monday in a news release. “We have worked together to cultivate a highly competitive, world-class port that continues to grow above the market ... I have always said it is great people who make a great port, and we are fortunate to have the best maritime community and team at SC Ports.”

During his tenure as CEO, Newsome has won several prestigious awards, including earning South Carolina’s Public Servant of the Year from the state Chamber of Commerce in 2014, and helped expand ports around the state.

Newsome said Monday that he has worked nonstop without a break since September 1977 when he earned his Master of Business Administration from the University of Tennessee and was looking forward to the next phase of his life. He will, however, stay on as an executive advisor for the ports authority for the first year after his departure.

But instead of reflecting on his tenure as CEO, Newsome said looked to the future and praised both the board and his soon-to-be successor.

“The ultimate picture of success in an organization or in a business is when the replacement for the outgoing CEO can be found within the organization,” he said. “There is no better qualified person in this industry to run the South Carolina Ports Authority than Barbara Melvin. I can tell you that for a natural fact.”

Following the event, Ports board chairman Bill Stern credited Newsome and Melvin for the agency’s continued success.

“Jim Newsome has truly made a significant and lasting impact on South Carolina’s economy and supply chain,” he said. “He led a major turnaround effort of SC Ports when he joined in 2009, assuring SC Ports continues to flourish as a top 10 U.S. container port. Under his great leadership, we have seen significant growth at the port and at port-dependent businesses around the state.

“It is not often that two impressive leaders work so well together over many years to achieve a shared vision.”

This story was originally published October 18, 2021 3:17 PM.

Here’s where new, high-end Rock Hill residences may next be built

High-end townhomes and new homes near the Catawba River are the next part of residential growth in Rock Hill.The city planning commission met Tuesday night. In addition to mostly industrial projects covering about 2,500 acres along I-77, the commission heard current and coming plans for homes.Integrity Development Group applied to annex and rezone 23 acres along West Main Street and Heckle Boulevard. The property has frontage on both roads, but doesn’t include their intersection. The site is adjacent to Herlong Ridge comm...

High-end townhomes and new homes near the Catawba River are the next part of residential growth in Rock Hill.

The city planning commission met Tuesday night. In addition to mostly industrial projects covering about 2,500 acres along I-77, the commission heard current and coming plans for homes.

Integrity Development Group applied to annex and rezone 23 acres along West Main Street and Heckle Boulevard. The property has frontage on both roads, but doesn’t include their intersection. The site is adjacent to Herlong Ridge community, just south of Huntington.

Plans include 90 new townhomes. The land is largely wooded now, with one home on a parcel. Access would come off Main, via a new public road.

“This would be a new public street that would come in and extend all the way down, with on-street parking on both sides,” said City Planner Dennis Fields.

Most of the frontage along Heckle sits in or near floodplains.

“There would be a lot of areas that they would not be able to disturb,” Fields said.

Lennar Homes would build the project. Johnnie Hastings with developer Integrity Development Group said the new sites won’t be typical townhomes.

“These are going to be three-story townhomes,” Hastings said. “They will start at a purchase price of $350,000. They are two-car garage.”

Canopy Realtor Association collects home sale data in the Charlotte and surrounding regions. Through August, the more than 1,300 closed sales this year in Rock Hill averaged $285,000.

There will be a fence and landscape buffers around the property. Hastings said initial thoughts were for 120 townhomes, but his group settled on 90 units to allow the alleyways and other features required by the city.

Rock Hill City Council will hear the project as early as this month, and will have final say on the annexation.

The new home portion of Marvell is ready to move forward, too. The community at 2114 Riverchase Boulevard will be a mix of boutique apartments and homes along the Catawba River. The entire property was zoned a year ago to allow those uses. The city approved site plans for the apartments, a first phase that involves the reconfiguration of Riverchase Boulevard, in September.

Now the Charlotte-based property owner is ready for the home portion. It will have 69 lots on 19 acres.

Another project will have to wait a bit longer. The planning commission had an application for property at Laurel Creek Drive and Twin Lakes Road on its October agenda, but it was deferred until November. CH Acquisitions has almost 32 acres there and plans to annex and rezone the property into a master planned development.

‘A progressive city’: Dozens gather to talk Rock Hill’s future at mayor’s breakfast

A line of dozens of Rock Hill residents and employees extended far in front of the city’s Sports and Event Center early Thursday morning. Several had a steamy coffee in hand. Most made small-talk as the line slowly funneled inside.The residents, dressed in ties and heels, weren’t there for a sports event. They were there for the mayor’s once-every-three-years key influencer breakfast.“It’s going to be a great day,” Mayor John Gettys told those at the breakfast.Inside, the line continue...

A line of dozens of Rock Hill residents and employees extended far in front of the city’s Sports and Event Center early Thursday morning. Several had a steamy coffee in hand. Most made small-talk as the line slowly funneled inside.

The residents, dressed in ties and heels, weren’t there for a sports event. They were there for the mayor’s once-every-three-years key influencer breakfast.

“It’s going to be a great day,” Mayor John Gettys told those at the breakfast.

Inside, the line continued around a table covered in pastries and coffee. The small-talk carried on as people settled around several circular tables.

The breakfast, which drew about 100 people, provided a chance for city employees and residents to discuss Rock Hill’s future and honor influential residents who’ve had an impact on the city.

Those who attended the two-hour breakfast were tasked with answering the question of the morning — What makes Rock Hill, Rock Hill?

On a stage at the front of the room, Gettys spoke with the four influencers who would be recognized.

Gettys sat on the stage in an armchair flanked by Bishop Herb Crump and Rev. Steve Hogg.

The two pastors met in 2004 when Freedom Temple Ministries, founded by Crump, was destroyed by fire. As a result, First Baptist Church, led by Hogg, sold its Main Street building to Crump’s congregation.

“Rock Hill is a place that’s not a perfect city, but it’s a progressive city,” Crump, from New York, said. “What a better story of unity, progression and a willingness to embrace differences than a Kentucky pastor and a New York pastor working together to make what I think we both believe to be one of the most recognizable transactions in the history of the city on Main Street?”

Crump said in order for the city to continue moving forward in establishing its own identity, Rock Hill leaders should not shy away from acknowledging the city’s historic and present racial and social injustices.

“In order for us to move forward, we have to continue in the efforts that were started by the previous administration and continued by this current administration of addressing real issues and not sugar-coating our efforts of addressing real issues affecting each and every one of us.”

The hundred in the crowd clapped. Some stood.

Hogg said, as the city continues to experience its immense growth, he urged city officials to be aware that parts of the city will not be equally impacted.

“We need to think about the people who are displaced as we grow,” he said.

“Absolutely!” Rock Hill NAACP President Norma Gray, who sat in front of the stage, said.

Dawn Johnson, who has served as chair of the city’s Economic Development Corporation, said she is doing exactly that.

During the breakfast, Johnson, founder of Rock Hill’s Black Economic Leadership League, discussed her efforts to bring more business development to the south side of Rock Hill.

“How can we do something uniquely different for this side of town, but have the same quality, growth, opportunities and jobs?” Johnson said.

Clinton College President Lester McCorn also is working to make sure the south side of the city sees the same development as the rest of the city. Thursday, he highlighted the Clinton ConNEXTion Action Plan, a partnership between the city and community partners, to bring more jobs, housing and businesses to historic Rock Hill neighborhoods.

The plan, established earlier this year, works to ensure those in the historic area in and around Clinton College, one of South Carolina’s eight historically black colleges and universities, have equitable access to resources and opportunities.

“HBCU’s are often in neighborhoods that are challenging, distressed,” McCorn said. “HBCUs have wonderful opportunities if they are positioned to bring economic and community development to those neighborhoods and lift them up.”

The plan has further established Clinton College as an essential aspect of the city, McCorn said.

“Not only is Clinton College punching far above her weight, Clinton College is literally changing lives,” he said.

Clinton ConNEXTion has already made an impact, McCorn pointed out.

He highlighted the city’s effort to create a new tax increment financing district in the south side of Rock Hill. The city is seeking $225 million for its south side redevelopment plan — as part of Clinton ConNEXTion.

“If we want to be ‘Rock Hill For All,’ we have to make an extra effort to make sure that happens because absent that vigilance and accountability does not bring about equality,” McCorn said.

The funds would go to improvements to the area’s streets, utilities, storm water and assist with property acquisition.

York County Council will discuss the proposed TIF during its Oct. 4 meeting. Rock Hill will hold a public hearing on the TIF on Oct. 11.

“This is the perfect moment,” McCorn said. “The stars are aligning in Rock Hill. This is our moment.”

The crowd clapped.

“I think that is our story in Rock Hill now,” Gettys said at the end of the breakfast. “It’s an explosion of opportunity and an explosion of colors … all the development, people that are coming in, engagement from so many that haven’t engaged before, so that really is our charge as we leave here today.”

This story was originally published October 1, 2021 11:01 AM.

International Artist, Shepard Fairey Set to Paint Mural In Rock Hill

(Photo Courtesy:ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong)ROCK HILL, S.C. (CN2 NEWS) – Th...

(Photo Courtesy:ObeyGiant.com / Photographer Jon Furlong)

ROCK HILL, S.C. (CN2 NEWS) – The art scene in Rock Hill is about to get even bigger as world-renowned artist, Shepard Fairey comes to town.

According to leaders with the city of Rock Hill, Fairey plans to pain a large-scale mural on a wall located at 153 East White Street in downtown Rock Hill.

You may see him in action October 16th through the 19th.

This mural will add to Rock Hill’s Mural Mile Project.

While Fairey is in town, 60 art pieces have been chosen for public display and sale for a limited time.

Those interested can view the air October 17th through October 31st, Wednesdays through Sundays at the same location from 4 PM until 8 PM.

To learn more about Shepard Fairey visit: www.obeygiant.com and watch CN2 News Monday, October 18th at 6 PM.

“I’m very excited to paint a mural and exhibit my art in Rock Hill because I grew up spending a lot of time with family in the city and surrounding countryside,” said Shepard Fairey. “My mural celebrates various aspects of Rock Hill’s industrial history while also sharing my philosophy of open-mindedness, creativity, and adaptive disruption to progress into the future. I look forward to a great dialogue with the people of Rock Hill,” Fairey said.

“This project is a very important step in the further development of the “Mural Mile” in Rock Hill. The “Mural Mile” stresses the need to make art accessible, with murals on multiple buildings throughout the historic Old Town area. “We are so excited that an international artist of Shepard Fairey’s caliber has chosen to share his work with our Rock Hill community,” says Cathy Murphy, Downtown Development Manager for the City of Rock Hill. “This endeavor will truly bring attention and credence to our ‘Mural Mile’ project being completed over the next few years.”

Funding debate could lead Visit York County to merge with Rock Hill. What would it mean?

Some leaders say they want to keep York County’s long-time tourism agency, but that may not matter if they don’t provide funding.Billy Dunlap, president of Visit York County, told York County Council on Monday night that his staff is in favor of joining the Rock Hill Parks, Recreation & Tourism depar...

Some leaders say they want to keep York County’s long-time tourism agency, but that may not matter if they don’t provide funding.

Billy Dunlap, president of Visit York County, told York County Council on Monday night that his staff is in favor of joining the Rock Hill Parks, Recreation & Tourism department. The Visit York County board of directors voted several months back and then again in a separate vote last week to make the move.

The county recently got an email from the Visit York County board chair stating intentions. Dunlap said the board is split but the majority sees Rock Hill as the best option.

“Our preference is to merge with Rock Hill PRT because it gives us stable funding on an annual basis,” Dunlap said. “That was the sole reason that we even looked at that option.”

For years the group was funded through the hospitality tax, charged on food and drink in unincorporated areas. So along with large-draw events in Rock Hill there was considerable promotion of farm events in western York County, fishing events on Lake Wylie and festivals across the county.

Dunlap said discussions with Rock Hill indicate the city would have his organization operate much as it does now.

“York County would get marketing services,” he said. “York, Clover, Tega Cay, Fort Mill, all of those municipalities would get marketing services as well.”

Those promotional services would align with funding. This fiscal year York County contributes $77,000 to Visit York County. Clover puts in $6,000, compared to $110,000 for Rock Hill. Fort Mill, Tega Cay and York also contribute.

Dunlap’s group would still work to attract events outside of Rock Hill. He doesn’t know yet if a name change would accompany the switch.

“It’s basically going to be who participates in funding,” Dunlap said. “If the entire county participates in funding, then it’ll have to have some sort of regional name to it.”

Dunlap arrived in 2018 when the county paid most of the agency’s $1.2 million annual budget. His group since has lost about $1.1 million of that county funding, Dunlap said. Other revenue sources are in place now for what is about a $1.9 million budget.

A funding agreement when Dunlap arrived had the county contributing $750,000-$1.2 million annually for five years, Dunlap said. Council abolished that agreement less than six months after it began, he said. In recent years, council continued to gradually cut funds.

Councilman Joel Hamilton said it appears some on his group want something for free. On Monday night the group discussed a roughly $20,000 contribution to Visit York County.

“That’s nothing,” Hamilton said. “If we’ve taken their funding from $750,000 to $300,000 to zero recently. This council placed so little value on your efforts that we decided it wasn’t worth us funding. But now no one wants to give it up.”

The biggest funding change came when council opted to route most of the hospitality tax dollars to the new Riverbend Park project. The purchase, development and operations of that site will sap years of hospitality tax revenue.

Councilman Tom Audette said capital projects like Riverbend are the best use of hospitality tax dollars. He said he supports accommodations tax money, charged on overnight stays, to fund Visit York County.

“That to me is the direction the revenue should be pointed in,” Audette said.

Councilwoman Allison Love said the funding debate has been ongoing for years and she understands why council members from Rock Hill would support funding the group. Love said she doesn’t trust all the hospitality figures the group generates. She said her district of Lake Wylie and Clover doesn’t see the same benefit Rock Hill does.

“There are those of us that are looking at this from a different viewpoint,” Love said.

Some council members who voted to cut funding in recent years point to Dunlap’s ability to generate new revenue. When he arrived, two municipalities paid into his group. Now five do. Dunlap also created a destination marketing fee where hotels charge a voluntary 2% that Dunlap’s group uses to promote those hotels and nearby attractions.

“All of the hotels are in Rock Hill or Fort Mill,” Dunlap said.

Last year the fee generated about $350,000 in Rock Hill and $180,000 in Fort Mill.

Rock Hill has its own hospitality and accommodations taxes to fund tourism and capital projects within the city.

David Roberts, past Visit York County chairman, is in his seventh year on the board. He said the last $300,000 cut led to the discussion about Rock Hill PRT.

His board is most concerned with protecting jobs and benefits of the seven staff members. Roberts is against merging with Rock Hill, if the county can provide funding. Not all tourism, he said, happens in Rock Hill.

“Rock Hill has all the facilities...,” Roberts said. “But they don’t have Lake Wylie or they don’t have Bush-N-Vine. They don’t have Brattonsville. There’s other things. If we go to the City of Rock Hill, I’m concerned we’re looking at this as the City of Rock Hill taking care of the county. I think it should be the other way around.”

Brown Simpson also sits on the board. He also is parks and recreation director in Fort Mill. It’s been a tough and frustrating few years for Visit York County, but Brown also would like to remain under county control.

“If you want this to be a vibrant organization, give us some consistent funding in the long-run for years that will make this the best organization we can have it be, that represents all of York County,” Simpson said.

Area attractions work together, like Windy Hill Orchard and others that get a boost when Rock Hill brings in a large crowd.

“They benefit every weekend,” Simpson said.

Visit York County now is bidding on events for 2025-26. Dunlap points to a Major League Fishing event on Lake Wylie two weeks ago. That event was booked three years ago on a $50,000 bid, he said. That money was part of the lost funding his group had to find to keep the event.

“This organization cannot operate on a year-to-year basis,” Dunlap said. “The issue that we have is consistent funding going forward.”

A merger with Rock Hill could provide more stable funding, he said. It also would mean the loss of his board.

While Dunlap said countywide events and attractions would remain a focus, he also understands Rock Hill would continue to get a considerable amount of tourism attention.

“It will be to some extent but right now we’re Rock Hill PRT focused,” Dunlap said. “I mean let’s face it. They’ve got all the facilities.”

Rock Hill has its sports and event center. It has Cherry Park and Manchester Meadows, and world class cycling and BMX facilities. The Carolina Panthers headquarters will include an event venue.

“If others areas want the monumental attractions, they’re going to have to build them,” said Councilman William “Bump” Roddey. “If other areas want those advertising dollars to be poured into those areas, they’re going to have to have the facilities....”

Roddey said a merger with Rock Hill should be the last option and he’d hate to lose what York County has become. A destination county, Roddey said, not just a destination city.

“We’ve put a lot of money into this branding over the years,” Roddey said. “We put a lot of money into building Visit York County.”

Councilman Robert Winkler said the county put Visit York County in a bind. He voted against funding cuts, he said, to avoid the decision now at hand.

“Every time I’ve made a motion to try to keep the funding whole, it’s been voted down,” Winkler said. “So I’m glad to hear that we’re finally wanting to talk about how to keep their funding solid. I’m open to any suggestion, because I’ve run out of ideas for my part.”

Hamilton also voted to maintain funding but, with council decisions thus far, believes Rock Hill could now be the better option.

“In my mind this council already made that decision when we voted to cut funding to zero,” Hamilton said. “We already told the community what we thought of (Visit York County) when we decided to cut the funding to zero.”

Dunlap understands how important a decision faces his group.

“This is a critical decision for this organization,” he told council Monday night. “This organization lives and dies, potentially, with this decision that you’re talking about tonight.”

There are advantages to partnerships with the city and county, but those county advantages alone can’t make up what’s become a wide financial gap.

“It all revolves around funding,” Dunlap said.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.